Drone-Killing the Turkish Cleric in Pennsylvania?

In 2003, the CIA kidnapped a cleric from the streets of Milan, Italy and shipped him to Egypt to be tortured (CIA agents involved have been prosecuted in Italy, though the U.S. Government has vehemently defended them). In 2004, the U.S. abducted a German citizen in Macedonia, flew him to Afghanistan, tortured and drugged him, then unceremoniously dumped him back on the street when they realized he was innocent, but has refused ever since to compensate him or even apologize, leaving his life in complete sham

Source: Would Turkey Be Justified in Kidnapping or Drone-Killing the Turkish Cleric in Pennsylvania?

They should all be tried for war crimes

In August 2002, a group of FBI agents, CIA agents, and Pakistani forces captured Zubaydah (along with about 50 other men) in Faisalabad, Pakistan. In the process, he was severely injured — shot in the thigh, testicle, and stomach. He might well have died, had the CIA not flown in an American surgeon to patch him up. The Agency’s interest in his health was, however, anything but humanitarian. Its officials wanted to interrogate him and, even after he had recovered sufficiently to be questioned, his captors occasionally withheld pain medication as a means of torture.

Source: They should all be tried: George W. Bush, Dick Cheney and America’s overlooked war crimes – Salon.com

The U.S. Still Fighting Torture Report

Government lawyers on Thursday continued their fight to bury the Senate Torture Report, arguing before the D.C. District Court of Appeals that the 6,700-page text could not be released on procedural grounds.When the 500-page executive summary of the report was released more than a year ago, it prompted international outcry and renewed calls for prosecution. The summary describes not only the CIA’s rape and torture of detainees, but also how the agency consistently misrepresented the brutality and effectiv

Source: The U.S. Government Is Still Fighting to Bury the Senate Torture Report